mezzanie grating

In the refurbished Montreal apartment designed by Canadian architect Jean-Maxime Labrecque, the cover of subway ventilation ducts is used as walls, railings and storage rooms.
The decoration by local designers includes the kitchen and living space on the first floor, and two or more mezzanine floors.

 

Bar-Grate-Mezzanine

 

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The white grille provides a connection between the three levels that form the railing, the wall and the built-in closet, and reminds the name of the hotel, the aluminum scarf. This space is wrapped in a metal scarf made of a white aluminum scarf, which is a material commonly used in industrial environments,” Labreck said.
The designer’s main intervention was to replace the existing black spiral staircase and railing with a white staircase. The tall white grate acts as a stair railing beside the steps.
“The scarf first covers the staircase leading to the first mezzanine, becoming a railing, then extends to the second staircase that follows, and then sinks to wrap the majestic lamp-book shelf-luminous aluminum covering the entire length of one of them. Vertical wall,” he said.
The built-in bookshelf traverses the wall on the first floor, and the bookshelf door extends to the floor above. The metal frame is designed as a hinged door and hides the storage space equipped with shelves and aluminum ladders.
The local designer kept the bones of the apartment unchanged, including white columns and exposed wooden ceiling beams, which attracted attention to the 25-foot (7.6-meter) high ceiling. The glass tiles hidden in the bathroom on the first floor also come from the existing design.
The dark wood floor has also been polished and repaired in lighter tones to attract attention and appreciate the historic wooden structure on the ceiling.
In the rest of the Montreal apartment, the white finishes and the wood that form the kitchen cabinets and counters stand out. The black grand piano also provides bold contrast.
In addition to this residence, Jean-Maxime Labrecque (Jean-Maxime Labrecque) also designed another house in Montreal with a mirrored staircase, wooden floors and white walls.
Other renovations in the city include detached houses renovated by Appareil Architecture in the 1960s, and houses made up of Robitaille Curtis’s aerial grid that extends across the atrium.
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Post time: Nov-20-2020
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